Pool Safety

Safety Vacuum Release System For Pools

SR-500 Stingl Switch

(Safety Vacuum Release System)

The Model SR-500 is a Safety Vacuum Release System (SVRS) which works by monitoring the vacuum on the suction side of the pool or spa pump. When a blockage occurs in the main drain or skimmer a sudden rise in vacuum will cause the SR-500 to shut down pump operation and activate an audible alarm. The pump will remain off with the alarm sounding until manually reset.

Features and Benefits

  • Complies with ASME/ANSI 112.19.17 as required by the International Building Codes (IBC) and the International Residential Codes (IRC)
  • Meets all current codes and standards for SVRSs on new and existing pools and spas
  • Can act as pool controller with programmable timer, or as stand alone SVRS working in conjunction with existing pool controller
  • Newest state-of-art NEC microprocessor technology– guaranteed reliability and performance
  • Vacuum monitored 128 times per second — rapid response and accurate readings
  • Power monitored 50/60 times per second — insures continuous power detection
  • Can act as a pool and spa controller – with fully programmable 24 hour timer, or as stand alone SVRS working in conjunction with existing pool and spa controller
  • Integrates with existing timer box – (for easy retrofit)
  • Low vacuum sensing – (prevents cavitations or running the pump dry, eliminating costly equipment failure)
  • 30 minute maintenance override – (for pool or spa service)
  • Accessible extra dry contact – auxiliary equipment can be added
  • Power back-up – insures settings and reading will be saved (30 minute rapid recharge)
  • Display error readout – (prevents guessing during troubleshooting)
  • Works on all size pumps
  • Easy and trouble free installation – (no pipes to cut or glue)
  • Turns off pump in milliseconds upon detecting sudden vacuum change
  • Multiple audible alarm capabilities – allows for quicker alert to harmful situations
  • Provides a layer of protection, reducing entrapment risk

New” SR-500 PS Pool/Spa Combination Stingl Switch

(Safety Vacuum Release System)

The Model SR-500PS is specifically designed for Residential Pool/Spa combinations that share  one common pump, and still provides the same reliable vacuum entrapment detection capabilities as the Model SR-500 Stingl Switch.

  • 2 Vacuum memory settings – one for the pool, and one for the spa
  • Dry contact input – for total automation used in conjunction with any remote system

Features and Benefits

  • Complies with ASME/ANSI A112.19.17 (SVRS Standards) as required by the International Building Codes (IBC) and the International Residential Codes (IRC)
  • Meets all current codes and standards for SVRS’s on new and existing pools and spas
  • Newest state-of-art NEC microprocessor technology – guaranteed reliability and performance
  • Vacuum monitored 128 times per second – rapid response and accurate readings
  • Power monitored 50/60 times per second – insures continuous power detection
  • Can act as a pool and spa controller – with fully programmable 24 hour timer, or as stand alone SVRS working in conjunction with existing pool and spa controller
  • Integrates with existing timer box – (for easy retrofit)
  • Low vacuum sensing – (prevents cavitations or running the pump dry, eliminating costly equipment failure)
  • 30 minute maintenance override – (for pool or spa service)
  • Power back-up – insures settings and reading will be saved (30 minute rapid recharge)
  • Display error readout – (prevents guessing during troubleshooting)
  • Works on all size pumps
  • Easy and trouble free installation – (no pipes to cut or glue)
  • Turns off pump in milliseconds upon detecting sudden vacuum change
  • Multiple audible alarm capabilities – allows for quicker alert to harmful situations
  • Provides a layer of protection, reducing entrapment risk

Reasons You Should Be Interested in a Safety Vacuum Release System
Regulatory Overview

 The International Code Council’s International Building Codes and International Residential Codes, as well as the Consumer Product Safety Commission’s Guidelines, include language on the use of Safety Vacuum Release Systems.

The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) is an agency that “accredits” standards promulgators such as ASME, ASTM & NSPI.  This is the national system for insuring that standards development organizations follow strict procedures and maintain a true consensus process.

nternational Code Council (ICC) – The ICC was established in 1994 as a non profit organization dedicated to the development of a single set of comprehensively nationally recognized construction codes.

The International Building Code (IBC) and the International Residential Code (IRC) both mandate “three layers of protection.”  IBC 3109.5 and IRC AG 106 require all pools and spas (regardless of water depth) to be equipped with an accepted method for vacuum relief.  These codes call for devises that meet ASME A112.19.17 standards to provide this vacuum relief.   The vast majority of state and local governments utilize the IBC and the IRC codes as models for their own codes.

Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) – The CPSC published Guidelines for Entrapment Hazards:  Making Pools and Spas Safer in March 2005.  Included in the recommendations is the use of SVRSs for newly constructed pools and existing pools……………

“Due to care and maintenance concerns associated with circulation systems that include suction outlets (main drains)  and covers, consideration should be given to the installation of a back-up systems that relieves entrapping suction and/or shuts down the pump when a blockage  is detected [ e.g., an SVRS]………” 

 

Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act
June 18, 2008 Staff Interpretation of Section 1404:“Federal Swimming Pool and Spa Drain Cover Standard”
On December 19, 2007, the President signed into law the Virginia Graeme Baker Pool and Spa Safety Act, named after the daughter of Nancy Baker and the granddaughter of former Secretary of State James Baker. Graeme Baker died in a tragic incident in June 2002 after the suction from a spa drain entrapped her under the water. (Click here to read all of the article)